Dr. James Dobson vs. Siggie and why you may have the distinct impression the Xtian Right wants to whip you into a cage literally

Who is Dr. James Dobson who will be one of those speaking on the Justice Sunday simulcast? James Dobson, who was the inspiration behind Tom Delay’s conversion?

Chris Dugan writes a commentary on James Dobson’s “The Strong-Willed Child” book in which Dobson describes an altercation with the family’s dachshund. In his commentary Dugan provides this excerpt from the book.

Continue reading Dr. James Dobson vs. Siggie and why you may have the distinct impression the Xtian Right wants to whip you into a cage literally

"Justice Sunday", the inference of "Just Us" justice, broken gavels and weighted questions

“Just Us Sunday” seems to beg to be observed in “Justice Sunday”.

I saw in my Site meter this evening someone had done a Google search for “Just Us Sunday” that led to here and then later another Google search for “Just-us” Sunday that led to Adult Christianity. I went over and checked and see that on the 15th Adult Christianity made a posting “Just Us” Sunday that talks some about the characters involved and raises the cinematic specter of Samuel Jackson. Head over and take a look.

I’m not surprised that out of more than one hat pops up “Just Us Sunday” as a response to “Justice Sunday” because the inference is obvious. I did my first “Just Us” poster the 16h-17th, posting on the 17th, and posted a second one that day.

But I wanted to put up here that Adult Christianity scored first. Drat.

Continue reading "Justice Sunday", the inference of "Just Us" justice, broken gavels and weighted questions

Sun kings and poppies and the spoils of war

Dorothy is nearly to the Emerald City, she can see it glittering green cross the poppy fields, its architecture that of an hopeful congregation of grain-filled silos. She and her friends rush into the blaze of scarlet blossoms carpeting the broad, open hills and the Wicked Witch appears, waving her arms as if to rouse the blossoms, alert her most beautiful of armies to the strangers in their midst so they will release in profusion their heaviest, sweetest, captivating scent. Dorothy becomes drowsy. She is encouraged to continue but is unable. Her eyelids grow heavier than ever they have before, her legs drift away from her so she is unable to stand. Down to the ground she slips and falls into a deadly, satisfied sleep, her friends crying out for help. Eventually a rescuing light snow falls, dispelling the soporific effect of the poppy.

At the end of Altman’s “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” as McCabe is buried by snow in the desperate, poisonous gold rush town where he went to make his final fortune, the prostitute Mrs. Miller, a customer in an opium den, reclining on her bunk, reveals at last to the viewer the treasure that has captured her heart, her devotion, her soulful companionship. Withdrawn from the world, eyes reaching far beyond the town, unaware of McCabe’s death, she emerges from herself into an isolated, exclusive landscape that steals her away from her surroundings and us.

Meanwhile, the town saves the Protestant church from burning.

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A Radiant Botanist’s Primer: Lesson one, on the weeds and the flowers

From the NY Times which I see today has an article on megachurches (a subject I brought up in Friday’s post).

When you ask people how Radiant has changed their lives, they will almost invariably talk about how it helped open their hearts. But there’s a kind of narrowing going on here as well, which became clear a few minutes later, when Tom flipped to another passage from a recent sermon. ” ‘Some seed fell among the thorny weeds, and the weeds grew up with them and choked the good plants,’ ” he read, quoting Luke 8:7. Then he added his exegesis: ”We’ve had friends who were not Christian, and for me they were like the thorny weeds,” he said. ”We’ve had to commit ourselves to friends who could help us grow spiritually.”

Continue reading A Radiant Botanist’s Primer: Lesson one, on the weeds and the flowers

And she stole all the curtains and the dresser

Consider this two posts in one.

Happen (yesterday morning now) across the story at Pandagon. The IMAX movie, “Volcanoes of the Deep Sea”, banned at venues in southern states (GA, SC, NC and TX). Why? Because it mentions the dreaded big E word. Even the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History in Texas has declined to show the film, not wanting to spark controversy.

More here at Edpolitics and then at Panda’s Thumb.

A spokesman for the Science Museum in London described the development as worrying: ‘It is a very tight market in the Imax business and we would be extremely disappointed if this sort of pressure led to a narrowing of the market for popular Imax films.”

So march on the Creationists who are endeavoring to “take back” America from the terrorist nonpuritans who threaten to destroy holy capitalist industry with irreverent speculation on bipedalism.

Continue reading And she stole all the curtains and the dresser